Posts Tagged ‘baking’

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What am I bakery blogging?

September 7, 2017

 

Something devious was a foot at the Geauga County Fair in Burton, Ohio earlier this week. In addition to rides, funnel cakes, and animal exhibits, the fair featured close to 1,500 exhibits in the baked goods category.

Footprints in the frosting led investigators to conclude that a raccoon had helped him or herself to samples from the Best in Show exhibit indicating that the critter has good taste.

“Critter or critters unknown, favored yeast bread, miscellaneous bread (actual categories), muffins, scones, strawberry-surprise pie, chocolate cake, and in the men’s category: peach pie.”

From a story by James Ewinger, The Plain Dealer

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What am I baking?

April 13, 2017

Who am I kidding?  These amazing creations are by Iven Kawi . . .

“Jakarta-based pastry chef Iven Kawi says she made her first honest attempt at baking in December of 2013 when she made a batch of Christmas cookies for her daughter’s school. As you can see, things have progressed quite a bit. Kawi now runs a bakery shop out of her home in Lippo Karawaci called Iven Oven where she creates elaborately decorated baked goods. Among her specialties are cakes adorned with terrarium environments where buttercream frosting is sculpted into an abundance of cacti and flower petals atop beds of crumbly sand or dirt. You can follow more of her work on Instagram. “

via Colossal

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What am I baking?

February 23, 2017

croissants1

Homemade croissants – plain and filled with chocolate, or strawberry and cream cheese, or chestnut butter, or nutella.

I would share then recipe with you, but then I’d have to . . . you know.

croissants2

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What am I decorating?

March 10, 2016

One day when I was in first grade, I think it was for Valentine’s Day, we spent the afternoon decorating graham crackers. I thought they were the most delicious thing I had ever tasted.  In my memory, they looked just like this.

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cookies-site-2

cookies-site

Here is Mezesmanna on Instagram also on Facebook, via This is Colossal

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What am I baking?

December 21, 2015

Did you miss it?  Yesterday was Fruitcake  Day.

Now I know what you are thinking, but not all fruitcakes are the same.  There are some that should never see the inside of an oven.

But if you like fruit and you like cake, you can make a good one.  Just don’t put in any yucky stuff (citron).

fruitcake

 

This is a recipe for Stained Glass Fruitcake that I like very much that I  found in Sunset magazine many years ago.  I use dried apricots, pears, peaches, cherries and a mixture of different types of raisins, but use what you like.  The orange juice adds brightness to the cake. I bake it in mini loaf pans, and it is so good, the cakes don’t stay around for long. Make them early and cover with brandy soaked cheesecloth, if you like.  I like them just the way they come out of the oven.

If you don’t have an oven, check out the delicious fruitcake made by the nuns at the Transfiguration Hermitage in Windsor, Maine.

Here’s the recipe:

recipe

Cream the butter and sugar; add the eggs; mix the baking powder and salt with the flour; add dry ingredients alternating with the orange juice.  Then add the nuts and fruit.  Grease and flour the pan or pans.  Bake at 300 degrees (low and slow) for 2 1/2 to 3 hours.  If you are using small pans, check the cakes sooner because they will bake faster than a large loaf.  When a wooden skewer or toothpick inserted into the cake comes out clean, it is done.  Cool on a rack, but turn out of the pans when the cake is still warm, but not hot.

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What am I recommending?

November 10, 2015

This is a place we liked – huge red enameled oven imported from Italy; so screaming hot that your pizza cooks in 90 seconds.  Tasty, too. If you are in the area, they deserve a look – reblogged from HMS Defiant . . .

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PIZZA AND AMMO

We got an announcement today from a pizza place we ate at on our drive back home from San Diego. It was the first I received from them in almost a year. They’re not exactly beating the drum. It was though, excellent wood fired pizza and the atmosphere was friendly and inviting so we recommend it.

The place is also across the street from a Walmart that seemed to contain all the guns and ammo in Christendom. That may be no big draw for some, but living here in MetroParkCentralis and coming from San Diego, guns were scarce and ammo was even more conspicuously not available at either end. If I hadn’t loaded up with ammo at the Post Exchange at Fort Riley that morning, I’d have squeezed in some more .45 ammo.

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Where was I last weekend?

April 7, 2015

loganberry logotorte-MThe wonderful Loganberry Book Store held their annual Edible Books Festival on Saturday, April 4, where edible portrayals of real books were displayed, voted on, and consumed.

Here are some of the entries:

DSC01776Call of the Wild – or perhaps Cauliflower of the Wild

DSC01777Harry Butter and the Sorcerer’s Scone

DSC01779Annika’s Secret Wish portrayed with a delicious rice pudding as told in the story.

DSC01785The Tell-Tale Heart

(That is a matzoh Haggadah in the background – how appropriate for the season)

DSC01781Owl Moon by Jane Yolen

With strawberry owls sitting on chocolate rice krispie nests.

Entry consumption began at 2 pm and was completed by about 2:15!

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What am I celebrating on tattoo Tuesday?

February 17, 2015

cherry month

In addition to all of the other wonderful things that we celebrate in February, it is also National Cherry Month.

Why February, when cherry season is months away?  I don’t know.

Cherries are stone fruit – like apricots, peaches, and plums.  They are members of the genus Prunus.

The English word cherry, French cerise, Spanish cereza, and Turkish kiraz all derive from the classical Greek (κέρασος) through the Latin cerasum, which referred to the ancient Greek place name Cerasus, today the city of Giresun in northern Turkey in the ancient Pontus region, from which the cherry was first exported to Europe. The ancient Greek word κερασός “cherry” itself is thought to be derived from a pre-Greek Anatolian language. – Wikipedia

The top five cherry producing nations are Turkey, United States, Iran, Italy and Spain.

This is also a good time to trot out my Chocolate, chocolate, cherry, oatmeal, cookie recipe.  Also known as the Best Cookies You Have Ever Eaten.  See the recipe at this link.

Here is a tattoo . . .

cherry tattoo

 

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What am I celebrating?

December 1, 2014

pie_fixes_orange_magnetDecember is National Pie Day and when I think of pie, I always think of Moody’s Dinner.

Michael Stern’s  review of Moody’s is from RoadFood (click here).

moodys walnutThis is the walnut pie (real whipped cream) and the rest of the dessert menu.

WEB DESSERT MENU 7-2014

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What am I eating today?

November 17, 2014

breadToday is Homemade Bread Day

What could be better than a slice of golden-crusted homemade bread, warm from the oven, with melty butter – a symphony of aroma, sight and taste.  Heaven!

I thought this was interesting:

Partly because of its importance as a basic foodstuff bread has a social and emotional significance beyond its importance in nutrition; it plays essential roles in religious rituals and secular culture. Its prominence in daily life is reflected in language, where it appears in proverbs, colloquial expressions (“He stole the bread from my mouth”), in prayer (“Give us this day our daily bread”) and even in the etymology of words such as “companion” and “company” (literally those who eat/share bread with you.  Ref. Wiki.

Some people are afraid of bread baking – nothing could be simpler.  The only caveat is to keep the of the liquids at a temperature that will nurture and not kill the yeast (between 110 and 115 degrees F) – use an “instant” read thermometer – no surprises.  Other than that – and allowing enough time for the dough to rise – you can make good bread in an infinite number of ways.  I read a lot of recipes, but when I make bread I tend to wing it.  Sometimes I use milk for the liquid, sometimes water, sometimes I add an egg, sometimes, not.  I vary the sugar source (food for the yeast) at my whim – sugar, or malted syrup, or honey, or agave syrup, etc. I usually make white bread and have found that bread flour helps make a loaf with body.  Sometimes I add flaked wheat, or seeds – flax, sunflower, etc.)

I have learned that if you watch the temperature when adding the liquid to the yeast, take time to bloom the yeast, either scald the milk (if using) to a simmer, or use dry milk, and don’t add the salt directly to the yeast (mix it into the dry ingredients) you should not have any trouble baking a respectable loaf of bread.  Hand knead or machine knead; bread machine or old school baking.  It will be delicious!

Here’s a basic recipe for a white sandwich loaf from King Arthur Flour (wonderful people):

3 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour*
1/2 cup milk (skim, 1%, 2% or whole, your choice)**
1/2 to 2/3 cup hot water, enough to make a soft, smooth dough**
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) melted butter or vegetable oil
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 packet active dry yeast dissolved in 1 tablespoon warm water OR 2 teaspoons instant yeast

*For added whole-grain goodness, substitute great-tasting King Arthur 100% White Whole Wheat Flour for up to half of the all-purpose flour in this recipe.

**Mix the cold-from-the-refrigerator milk with 1/2 cup of the hot-from-the-tap water to make a lukewarm combination.

Mixing: In a large bowl, combine all of the ingredients and stir till the dough starts to leave the sides of the bowl. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased surface, oil your hands, and knead it for 6 to 8 minutes, or until it begins to become smooth and supple. (You may also knead this dough in an electric mixer or food processor, or in a bread machine set to the dough or manual cycle). Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover the bowl, and allow the dough to rise till puffy though not necessarily doubled in bulk, about 1 to 2 hours, depending on the warmth of your kitchen.

Shaping: Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled work surface, and shape it into an 8″ log. Place the log in a lightly greased 8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ loaf pan, cover the pan loosely with lightly greased plastic wrap, and allow the bread to rise for about 60 minutes, until it’s domed about 1″ above the edge of the pan. A finger pressed into the dough should leave a mark that rebounds slowly.

Baking: Bake the bread in a preheated 350°F oven for 30 to 35 minutes, until it’s light golden brown. Test it for doneness by removing it from the pan and thumping it on the bottom (it should sound hollow), or by measuring its interior temperature with an instant-read thermometer (it should register 190°F at the center of the loaf). Remove the bread from the oven, and cool it on a wire rack before slicing. Store the bread in a plastic bag at room temperature. Yield: 1 loaf.