Posts Tagged ‘tattoos’

h1

What’s up with the weather?

September 18, 2018

We are about to experience rains from the tail end of Hurricane Florence.  For those of you in the storm zone, here is a quick reference guide for hurricane categories.

It is Tuesday, so . . .

h1

What is tattoo Tuesday about?

August 21, 2018

“Some people are lucky enough to have found that special person they’ll spend the rest of their life with. And who wouldn’t want to celebrate that? There are many unconventional ways to tell the world “I’m in love!” Clothing is one form of expression, like couples who wear adorable matching sports jerseys or have spent the last 30 years coordinating outfits. Others take a more permanent approach to displaying their affection through creative couple tattoos.

Having matching or complementary tattoos with a romantic partner is far less temporary than wearing a ring. After all, it can’t (easily) be removed. So, there’s a lot of commitment involved with the decision to get inked in this way. But, it has a big upside—the tattooed beloveds will always carry a symbol of that relationship with them.

Many of those that take the leap sport clever designs. Designers Jessica Hische and Russ Maschmeyer have ink that corresponds to the other—and their professions. Before that, Hische was thinking about her tattoo and got Maschmeyer to go along with it with sound logic. “I convinced him it would be ‘conceptually stronger’ if I got the CMYK version of the same tattoo,” Hische told CreativeBloq. “He was a little freaked out about having a couple’s tattoo, but the more we talked about it the more it made sense. Russ got additive color (RGB) since his career passions were primarily screen-based; I got subtractive color (CMY) because I started my career in print design.” The result is a special tattoo that signifies their deep bond.”

from mymodernmet

h1

Why am I saying, “crank up the jam!”

August 14, 2018

I really don’t think anyone says that anymore.

But . . . I was recently the recipient of some marvelous, creatively-named jams.

Traffic Jam has all the red fruits in it; Bear Jam is based on blackberries; and who knew frogs could taste so good?

Many thanks to Robb.

It’s Tuesday . . .

h1

What is tattoo Tuesday about?

July 17, 2018

“Photographed over the course of three years, Alan Powdrill‘s COVERED is an interesting look at tattoo culture and our perceptions of people with body art. As tattoos have become increasingly commonplace and mainstream, the old adage “don’t judge a book by its cover” is proven to the fullest by Powdrill’s images of heavily tattooed people covered up—and stripped down.”

“By photographing and interviewing 40 people across England, Powdrill challenges us to reconsider our preconceived notions of what tattoos mean. While, there’s a long history of tattoos in Britain, introduced into Victorian culture by sailors and members of the military, there can also be stigmas associated with tattoo art. But certainly, over time, what it means to have a tattoo—and who has them—has evolved.”

“Powdrill, who met COVERED‘s participants through social media, tattoo conventions, and word of mouth, asks each to pose in front of their homes. One image shows the participants fully clothed, while the other depicts them stipped down and proudly showing off their body art. The side by side look at each subject can’t help but push viewers to focus on their reactions to the photographs, and reflect internally on why they have such feelings.”

Click here for the full article

h1

What is tattoo Tuesday about?

July 10, 2018

My apologies to everyone else in  Kentucky.

h1

What am I noting on tattoo Tuesday?

May 22, 2018

National Maritime Day

Each year on May 22 our country celebrates National Maritime Day.

The United States has always been and will always be a great maritime nation. From our origins as 13 British colonies, through every period of peace and conflict since, the Merchant Marine has been a pillar in this country’s foundation of prosperity and security. They power the world’s largest economy and strengthen our ties with trading partners around the world, all while supporting our military forces by shipping troops and supplies wherever they need to go.

In 1933, Congress declared National Maritime Day to commemorate the American steamship Savannah’s voyage from the United States to England, marking the first successful crossing of the Atlantic Ocean with steam propulsion. During World War II more than 250,000 members of the American Merchant Marine served their country, with more than 6,700 giving their lives, hundreds being detained as prisoners of war and more than 800 U.S. merchant ships being sunk or damaged.

Maritime Day is a time-honored tradition that recognizes one of our country’s most important industries. This year, ceremonies and celebrations throughout the country will recognized Maritime Day and the people our maritime nation depends on. Here in Washington, DC, our national ceremony details are as follows:

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
At the U.S. Department of Transportation
1200 New Jersey Ave. SE Washington D.C. 20590

from Maritime Administration US Department of Transportation

And from — WEARETHEMIGHTY​.COM

Related image

These days, tattoos are so commonplace in the U.S. military that every branch has its own policy as part of its uniform regulations, but a few years ago that wasn’t the case. The U.S. Navy, however, has a long tradition of tattoos.

Here’s the meaning behind a few of the classics:

1. Fully-Rigged Ships

A tattoo of a fully-rigged ship from the age of sail means the sailor had been around Cape Horn, the rough, stormy waters around the southern tip of South America. A fully-rigged ship is one with three or more masts, square sails fully deployed.

2. Nautical Star

The star is a symbol of a sailor always to be able to find his way home. The nautical star is a five-pointed star in dark and light shades counterchanged to resemble a compass rose.

3. Shellback Turtle

Sailors can wear the Shellback Turtle when they get initiated into King Neptune’s Court after crossing the equator. If you’re unsure what exactly this means, We Are The Mighty has an explainer for you:

4. Crossed Cannons

The crossed cannons mean a veteran has seen military service as a sailor.

5. Swallows

Sailors earn a new swallow tattoo for every 5,000 nautical miles traveled, which is about 5,754 regular miles, roughly the distance between New York City and Tel Aviv. The circumference of the earth is 21,639 nautical miles, just about 4.16 sparrows.

6. Anchor

A single anchor means the sailor crossed the Atlantic or has been a member of the merchant marine, a fleet of civilian ships that carries military cargo. In wartime, this fleet is mobilized to carry war materiel, including troops and supplies.

During World War II, the Merchant Marine took a beating with high casualties, entering the European war long before the United States itself. Since the U.S. was delivering war supplies to Britain through Lend-Lease, Nazi u-boats targeted U.S. shipping bound for the UK. The Merchant Marine casualty rate was 3.9 percent, whereas the Marine Corps’, the next highest, was only 2.94 percent.

7. Rope on the Wrist

A knot of rope on a sailors wrist identifies him as a deckhand, someone who maintains the hull, decks, superstructure, mooring, and cargo handling. Deckhands are still common in ocean-going vessels, though they’re far less likely to be maintaining wooden ships.

8. Hula Girl

Hula girls signify the sailor has been to Hawaii.

9. Crossed Anchors

Sailors wearing the crossed anchors on the webbing between their thumb and index finger are identifying themselves as boatswain’s mates, the guys who maintain the deck and take care of smaller boat operations and damage control parties.

10. HOLD and FAST

These words are a charm spelled out on the four front-facing fingers on each hand. Sailors hope it brings them good luck while gripping the rigging. Holding fast means the sailor isn’t going to let the line go, no matter what. Sailors were a superstitious bunch and life on a sailing ship was tough (to say the least). Anything that gave them the edge in saving their own lives was worth doing.

11. Pig and Rooster

The foot tattoos of pigs and roosters were worn by sailors in WWII in the hopes it would keep the sailor from drowning. The Navy shipped these animals in crates at the time. When ships went down, the crates floated, and the animals inside would sometimes be the only survivors

12. Compass Rose

Another good luck charm that allows a sailor to find his way home.

13. Crosses

Worn on the soles of a sailor’s feet, these are thought to ward off sharks

14. Dagger through a Rose

This tattoo means the sailor is loyal and willing to fight anything, even something as sweet and beautiful as a rose

15. Dragon

Wearing a dragon means the sailor has served in China.

16. Golden Dragon

When a sailor crossed the International Date Line, he earns the right to wear the Golden Dragon tattoo. The International Date Line is the imaginary line of longitude that separates two calendar dates. When someone sails from East to West, they set their clock back one hour for every 15 degrees of longitude they pass. When they pass the date line, they’ve gained a full 24 hours.

17. Harpoon

Sailors tattooed with harpoons were serving or had served in a whaling or fishing fleet.

18. King Neptune

German sailors in the 1930s being addressed by King Neptune while “crossing the line.”

Another badge of honor earned for crossing the Equator.

19. Palm Tree

The palm tree has two meanings, depending on your navy. Sailors in the Royal Navy during World War II could wear it after sailing on Mediterranean cruises. It can also be worn by U.S. sailors who served in Hawaii.


 

h1

What is tattoo Tuesday about?

May 15, 2018

Spaghetti O’s

Spaghetti o’s, the original, was first offered for sale on this date in 1965.  This product now comes in many varieties such as . . . with meatballs, with sliced franks, with calcium, organic, shaped like Star Wars characters the Mario Brothers, Spiderman, and Princesses.  Something for everyone.