Posts Tagged ‘food’

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What did I see this weekend?

October 28, 2019

We went to the apple orchard, but there was so much more . . .

So many Apple Fritters

Pies, dumplings . . .

and donuts, and, and, and . . .

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Why am I looking forward to Saturday?

September 12, 2019

The second Saturday of September is Pie Day in Pie Town, New Mexico.  This small community (population 186) has earned a reputation for offering excellent pies for sale.  It started as a crossroads community – a stop for people traveling west – and is now popular with tourists. This Saturday is Pie Day.  I would like to stop by the Pie-O-Neer cafe where they serve pie, “that’s it.” It sounds like my kind of place.  Here is a story about the town at Cowboys & Indians magazine.

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What am I bakery blogging?

June 17, 2019

I have a new favorite bakery – it is at my house.  This is a puff-pastry, mixed berry galette I made yesterday.  I defrosted too much puff pastry so I had to make cherry turnovers, too.

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What am I celebrating today?

March 28, 2019

Today is Something on a Stick Day

When I was a Girl Scout, we cooked out a lot.  We made campfires and sit-upons.  Occasionally, we had a treat that involved wrapping biscuit dough around a (cleaned) stick and baking it over the campfire.  When the biscuit was done, it was peeled off the stick and then stuffed with jam.  I remember that they were incredibly delicious.  I have not had one since I was eleven.  Imagine my surprise to find a recipe for biscuits on a stick in a book of recipes of Norwegian baked goods when I was last at the public library.

Here’s the recipe (but I think we used Bisquick):

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What am I baking on Pi Day?

March 14, 2019

Seattle-based pie baker Lauren Ko has a multitude of non-edible inspirations that influence her creative pastry designs, including textile patterns, architecture, and string art. These elements are woven into her colorful, and often geometric, fruit pies and tarts topped with thin, undulating strips of apples, precisely placed pomegranate seeds, and triangles of radiating strawberries. Often Ko will color a portion of her dough with natural food dyes like beet butter to add even more color to the finished dessert. You can learn step-by-step instructions for how Ko creates her enticing sweets in this video made by Tasty, and follow the evolution of her pies on Instagram.

from Colossal

See also

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What has me saying, “brrrr!”

February 25, 2019

You’ve seen the perfect arcs of boiling water solidified mid-throw, and perhaps this frozen speeding sign that duplicated itself over 2019’s Polar Vortex, but have you seen ghost apples? Thanks to a Facebook post by farm manager Andrew Sietsma, the phenomenon has captivated the internet, leaving commenters to marvel at the sight of these glass-like specimens that remain after apples have rotted from their icy exterior. Sietsema told CNN that this winter the weather in western Michigan was “just cold enough that the ice covering the apple hadn’t melted yet, but it was warm enough that the apple inside turned to complete mush (apples have a lower freezing point than water).” Jonagolds are one of Sietsema’s favorite apple varieties, but on the farm they are now referred to as “Jonaghosts.”

 

from colossal

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What am I baking?

February 21, 2019

Yesterday was muffin day but today I tackled no-knead foccacia rolls from Budget Bytes. They are spectacular and easy!  I left off the Italian seasoning on the top, but did brush them with olive oil.  Crispy and crusty and delicious.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 Tbsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp instant yeast
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil 
  • 2 Tbsp Italian seasoning

Instructions

  • The day before (about 18 hours ahead of time) combine the flour, salt, and yeast in a large bowl. Stir until well mixed. Add the water, starting with 1.5 cups, and add a little more at a time until the flour forms a cohesive, wet ball. There should not be any dry flour left on the bottom of the bowl. The total amount of water you’ll need will vary, but should be between 1.5 to 2 cups. See the photos below for more info.
  • Loosely cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it sit at room temperature for 16-18 hours to ferment.
  • After 16-18 hours, the dough will look like a large, bubbly mass. Sprinkle with enough flour to be able to scrape it out of the bowl without it sticking to your hands. Place the dough on a well floured surface. Cut the dough into 12 pieces. Shape each piece into a small ball. The dough will be quite wet, floppy, and sticky, so sprinkle liberally with flour as you work.
  • Place the rolls on a baking sheet covered in foil and lightly sprayed with non-stick spray (I used two baking sheets). Brush the top of each lightly with olive oil. Sprinkle the Italian seasoning over top. Let rise for 30 minutes to one hour or until doubled in size.
  • While the rolls are still rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Once it is fully preheated, place the rolls in the oven and bake until the surface is a light golden brown (about 25 minutes). Serve warm!