Posts Tagged ‘architecture’

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Whose birthday am I noting today?

June 8, 2019

Today is Frank Lloyd Wright’s 152nd birthday.  Every year on his birthday, the folks at Taliesin and Taliesin West bake this cake, his favorite, in his memory. Now you can, too.

Birthday Cake-June 8th-Frank Lloyd Wright

Serving size: Makes 16 servings

Butter and flour 2 bread loaf pans and line the bottoms with waxed paper.

9 eggs (separated)
1 1/3 C sugar
1 1/3 C cake flour (sift four times)
1/4 t cream of tartar
Pinch salt

Have eggs at room temperature. Separate eggs. Beat the egg yolks well. Add sugar gradually and beat until light and foamy. Add cake flour. Set aside.

Beat the egg whites, cream of tartar, and salt until stiff, but do not over beat. Fold egg whites into the batter by hand. Pour the batter into pans and bake at 300 degrees for 40-60 minutes. When cakes are done, remove from pans and cool completely on racks.

Filling:

20 oz. strawberry jam
8 oz. walnuts (finely ground)
8 walnut halves for garnish

Topping:

1 qt. whipping cream 
1/4 C confectioner’s sugar

Beat whipping cream until thick , add sugar and continue to beat until stiff.

Chocolate sauce:

1 t butter
2 oz. baker’s chocolate
1/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup water

Frank Lloyd Wright 150th birthday celebration at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin, Saturday June 3, 2017. / (c) Mark Hertzberg

Mix ingredients and cook until well blended and slightly thickened. Cool.

To assemble cake: Cut the cooled loaves in half lengthwise. On lower layers spread generously with filling: layer of strawberry jam, layer of ground walnuts, and a layer of whipping cream. Cover with the remaining loaf halves. Frost the top and sides of the cakes with whipping cream.

Pour the cooled chocolate sauce over the cake in an open, lacelike pattern, not solidly covering whipped cream. More chocolate than white should be showing, with some dribbling over the sides of the cake. Garnish with edible flowers if desired.

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Where am I living now?

January 7, 2019

denver18

I found this little gem of a photo series on my weekly fish through the LIFE archives, accompanied by just a few clues to the full story behind it. Filed under “Underground House in Denver, photographed in 1964 by Robert W Kelley”, I did a quick Google search of underground homes built or exhibited in 1964. The most relevant result I found was the Wikipedia page of an American businessman and philanthropist called Girard B. Henderson, who pioneered underground living and sponsored the Underground Home exhibit at the New York World’s Fair in 1964. But he also built homes in Colorado and Las Vegas, the latter of which you might remember we visited when it re-surfaced on the real estate market in 2013 for $1.7 million.

checking conditions outside

reblogged from messynessychic

Where am I living archives

 

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Why am I saying, “wow?”

December 27, 2018

As someone who has trouble getting her eye makeup on straight, I am in awe of the level of detail in these miniature sculptures by Matthew Simmonds.

His sculptures take a minimum of three weeks to complete, however they can span several months depending on the complexity and size. “The longest I’ve ever worked on a single piece of stone was when I made Windows in 2017,” explains Simmonds. “There was around 180 days, or nine months, of carving time with more time spent on research and design.”  from Colossal

 

 

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Where am I reading?

November 20, 2018

The Royal Portuguese Cabinet of Reading in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

From Timewaster

It’s Tuesday . . .

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Why am I saying, “Here there be monsters?”

October 15, 2018

Huge sea monster tentacles protrude from the roof and windows of a warehouse at the former Philadelphia Navy Yard.  The installation was perpetrated by UK artists Filthy Luker and Pedro Estrellas.   They call it, Sea Monsters HERE.  I think it is in a rather fitting location.

 

 

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What do I find fascinating?

April 2, 2018

“Today, views of the world’s ancient architectural wonders are firmly based in their current state of ruin, leaving to visitors’ imaginations the original glory of structures like the Parthenon, Pyramid of the Sun, and Temple of Luxor. NeoMam, in a project for Expedia, has resurrected several ancient buildings through a series of gifs. In a matter of seconds, centuries of natural and intentional damage and decay are reversed to reveal a rare glimpse at what the original structures would have looked like. The creative contractors behind the labor-intensive renderings are Maja Wrońska and her husband Przemek Sobiecki, who works as This Is Render.”

reblogged from Colossal

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Where am I living?

January 29, 2018

“Raymond Isidore didn’t plan on becoming an artist—let alone a sculptor who would go on to cover nearly every surface of his small home with glittering mosaics. But after a fateful stroll in 1938, when a shiny piece of broken crockery caught his eye, Isidore devoted the majority of the remainder of his life on the outskirts of Chartres, France, to the creation of one of the world’s most unique homes—an ecstatic expression of the untrained artist’s bursting imagination.

Isidore was born into a humble family in Chartres in 1900, and as a young man landed a position as the caretaker of a local cemetery. By all accounts, he led a provincial life; he married a woman roughly 10 years his senior and bought a humble plot of land not far from the famed Chartres Cathedral. There, Isidore built what began as a simple cottage, but soon transformed into his masterwork, known as La Maison Picassiette, which still stands and is accessible to the public today.”

Read the full article by Alexxa Gotthardt here on artsy.

See more unusual housing here.