Posts Tagged ‘design’

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What am I sappy cat blogging?

May 11, 2018

Using only black ink, Malaysian illustrator Kamwei Fong has created a menagerie of playful black cats. Despite their contextual isolation and uniform style, each of Fong’s cats display unique personalities: some are fluffed and puffed into self-contained balls; others look with curiosity or wariness at fish that dangle or waves that crash from the animals’ own tails. The artist builds each feline form using innumerable short thin lines, varying the density of the marks to create volume as well as a palpable sense of furriness.

Reblogged from This is Colossal.

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Why am I glassy-eyed?

May 9, 2018

By day, Virgina-based glass artist Kiva Ford fabricates one-of-a-kind glass instruments designed for special applications in scientific laboratories. By night, he retires to his home art studio where he utilizes his vast skillset to create curious glass vessels, miniatures, goblets, and other unusual creations working entirely by hand. Ford says his artistic practice is heavily inspired by his interests in mythology, history, and science.

Ford’s artistic observations of the natural world have begun to merge directly with his scientific glassblowing abilities in a number of new hybrid pieces. In Metamorphosis and Metamorphosis II, we see the sequence of a caterpillar morphing into a butterfly and an egg turning into a frog, all seamlessly encapsulated by handmade glass instruments, evoking the mystery of a ship in a bottle.

You can follow more of Ford’s work on Instagram and he sells hundreds of glass objects—mostly miniatures—through his Etsy shop.

from Colossal

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What am I painting?

April 23, 2018

Like medieval monks we hunched over our work benches, carefully laying down black, gilt, silver or copper lines.  Carefully copying to work of those who came before us.

Then came the rich colors, defining and enhancing the design.  Laid into the spaces on the silk like enamels on a cloisonne jewel.

This was our silk painting workshop.  Never has an afternoon passed so quickly.

It is difficult to perceive that all three of the following scarves are exactly the same design:

I loved it.

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What am I posting?

March 15, 2018

I have often thought of postage stamps as miniature works of art.  Here Diana Sudyka takes stamps one step further.  I love these. Make them bigger to see the details.

“Chicago-based Illustrator Diana Sudyka uses vintage stamps from Europe as the starting point for fanciful paintings created using gouache, ink, and watercolor. These miniature engravings of portraits, architecture, and ships  become fully formed figures and landscapes that merge with trees and flowers and convene with animals. Many of the artist’s paintings include phrases of hand-painted text that add an additional narrative element to the works.”

 

 

From Colossal

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What am I baking?

March 14, 2018

It’s Pi Day!

“Lauren Ko brings mathematical precision to her baking, using elaborate intertwined patterns to form transfixing patterns to the top of her homemade pies and tarts. The Seattle-based amateur baker has been piecrafting for just a couple of years, she tells Mic, and if you’re wondering, this is her favorite pie crust recipe. Ko combines classic crusts with colorful fillings like blueberries, kumquats, purple sweet potatoes, and pluots to create her visually striking sweets. You can follow her on Instagram.”

 

reblogged from Colossal

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What do I want?

February 5, 2018

Puppy1 is the world’s 1st self-balance and auto-follow suitcase.

Puppy 1 drives on 2 wheels, supported by Segway’s balancing technology.

With modes of auto-follow and remote control, you can either let Puppy1 follow you anywhere or ask it go wherever you want. It can also go back and forth with its bi-directional intelligent follow.

It can follow you at a speed as high as 18 km/h with positioning accuracy up to 5°.

Its electric power assistant, power ramp, deceleration and parking brake makes it capable to meet all your travel needs.

The Puppy1 will launch in middle of the year on crowdfunding.

From WordlessTech

 

What do I need?

A farmer in China creates ‘Suitcasemobile’ an inexpensive small-sized scooters, by recycling old suitcases, capable of carrying two people.

The farmer came up with this suitcase invention, after ten years of work, that runs up to 12.5 Mph (20 km/h) for 37 miles on one charge.

The Suitcasemobile consisting of a stripped-down electric scooter embedded into a suitcase, also includes a navigation system.

Also from WordlessTech

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What am I knitting?

January 30, 2018

“In the United States and abroad, wartime has long involved knitters. Especially before women were involved in combat, they were encouraged to support troops from home by knitting necessary items for soldiers such as socks and hats. Since knitting was a very common sight, nobody would think of knitting as a suspicious activity. But knitting and espionage have a certain connection throughout history.

Let’s go way back to the Revolutionary War in the United States. As British troops took over the homes of colonials during the war, these people became less than pleased. One such dissatisfied rebel was Molly “Mom” Rinker of Philadelphia. Troops quartered themselves in her house and did not allow the men of the household into the dining area, but Molly was allowed in to serve the troops. It was here that she listened closely to their conversations. She would then write the information down on a small piece of paper, wrap it around a stone, and wrap yarn around the stone until she had a very normal-looking ball of yarn. She would take this yarn ball to a rock overlooking some woods. There she would sit and knit, dropping the ball of yarn off the rock and into the woods below without notice. One of George Washington’s men would ride by and grab the yarn to learn British military secrets.

“During World War I, another yarn-equipped informant helped the Allies. A Frenchwoman named Madame Levengle would sit in front of her window and knit. As she knitted, she would watch troop movements from the window and tap her feet on the floor to send codes to her children pretending to do schoolwork on the floor below. The children would write down the codes, and all went unnoticed by nearby German marshals the whole time.

In World War II, an infamous American spy named Elizabeth Bentley used knitting to disguise her espionage as well. She ran two spy rings that sent damaging information about the United States to the Soviet Union, and she would sneak documents to the Soviets in her knitting bag.

Phyllis Latour Doyle was a secret agent for Britain during WWII. She parachuted into Normandy in 1944 and chatted with German soldiers, acting as a friendly helper. But then she knitted messages to the British, which they translated using Morse Code. Knitting coded messages is a form of steganography, which is a way to physically hide messages. A specific combination of knit and purl stitches could be translated into messages.

While knitting coded messages was less common than using knitting to disguise suspicious activity, codes in knitting were still a threat. The Belgian Resistance during World War II recruited women who had windows overlooking railway yards. They were to note the German train movements with their knitting: Purl one for one type of train, drop one for another. During World War II, the Office of Censorship in the United States banned people from posting knitting patterns abroad, since the instructions could in fact disguise military secrets.

Next time you suspect someone might not give knitters the respect they deserve, make sure to set them straight with the radical history of wartime knitters!”

 

Reprinted from Interweave article by Jenna Fear.