Posts Tagged ‘food art’

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What am I baking on Pi Day?

March 14, 2019

Seattle-based pie baker Lauren Ko has a multitude of non-edible inspirations that influence her creative pastry designs, including textile patterns, architecture, and string art. These elements are woven into her colorful, and often geometric, fruit pies and tarts topped with thin, undulating strips of apples, precisely placed pomegranate seeds, and triangles of radiating strawberries. Often Ko will color a portion of her dough with natural food dyes like beet butter to add even more color to the finished dessert. You can learn step-by-step instructions for how Ko creates her enticing sweets in this video made by Tasty, and follow the evolution of her pies on Instagram.

from Colossal

See also

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What has me saying, “brrrr!”

February 25, 2019

You’ve seen the perfect arcs of boiling water solidified mid-throw, and perhaps this frozen speeding sign that duplicated itself over 2019’s Polar Vortex, but have you seen ghost apples? Thanks to a Facebook post by farm manager Andrew Sietsma, the phenomenon has captivated the internet, leaving commenters to marvel at the sight of these glass-like specimens that remain after apples have rotted from their icy exterior. Sietsema told CNN that this winter the weather in western Michigan was “just cold enough that the ice covering the apple hadn’t melted yet, but it was warm enough that the apple inside turned to complete mush (apples have a lower freezing point than water).” Jonagolds are one of Sietsema’s favorite apple varieties, but on the farm they are now referred to as “Jonaghosts.”

 

from colossal

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What am I watching?

January 9, 2019

I admit to being a fan of the Great British Baking Show.  While I enjoy the illustrations describing what the bakers are going to make, I did not give them much thought until I read this article about the show’s illustrator:

In the midst of The Great British Baking Show’s controversial migration between British networks two years ago — a creative decision that lost 75 percent of the show’s personalities — tabloid speculation ran wild at the time about what this new Baking Show iteration would entail, given that the only person following the dough was Paul Hollywood and his piercing blue eyes. The only person on camera, that is. Because also choosing to stay in the show’s family was Tom Hovey, arguably the fifth puzzle piece in its sugary, buttery DNA. You don’t know his face, but you definitely know his work — and that’s because he’s responsible for creating every illustration in Baking Show history, from day one and beyond.

“It’s a real case of being at the right place at the time right time,” Hovey told Vulture about landing the gig. “My best mate worked in television and suggested that I apply for a job in ‘the edit’ at this new cookery show. With no TV experience or idea about how edits worked, I blagged my way in and started two days later.” Soon after beginning this editing job, though, Hovey admitted to the directors and editors that his passion was actually illustration, which spurred the higher-ups to spontaneously incorporate something artistic into the show. “It led to the director coming to me in the second week saying that he felt there was a visual element missing and maybe I could come up with some ideas,” Hovey recalled. “I sketched a few examples, we decided on a style that fit the bill and I got the gig.”

 

more at The Vulture

See also his website

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What am I sculpting?

July 26, 2018

“Goldfish and octopuses that look like glass, tiny real looking pandas, shiba inu dogs, rabbits, dragons, and snakes… all edible. In the art of Amezaiku (飴細工), artisans craft small candy lollipop sculptures.

During the Heian period, the art of amezaiku was imported from China and was probably first used in Japan for candy offerings made at temples in Kyoto. The amezaiku craft spread beyond the temple during the Edo period, when many forms of street performance flourished in Japan and when its base ingredient, mizuame, became widely available. In Edo it emerged in its present artistic form.

The Great Big Story episode above shares the work of 27 year old Shinri Tezuka, and one of two Japanese Amezaiku artisan candy makers that are crafting these sweet sculptures commercially. You can visit his Asakusa workshop or his Tokyo Sky Tree Town Soramachi shop, both in Tokyo.”

 

I’m a sucker for these things.

More here.

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What do I find a-peeling?

May 17, 2018

We are getting toward the end of the clementine season – those sweet, easy to peel, lovely to eat little bundles of juice.  Here are some of my lunch time efforts.

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What am I baking?

March 14, 2018

It’s Pi Day!

“Lauren Ko brings mathematical precision to her baking, using elaborate intertwined patterns to form transfixing patterns to the top of her homemade pies and tarts. The Seattle-based amateur baker has been piecrafting for just a couple of years, she tells Mic, and if you’re wondering, this is her favorite pie crust recipe. Ko combines classic crusts with colorful fillings like blueberries, kumquats, purple sweet potatoes, and pluots to create her visually striking sweets. You can follow her on Instagram.”

 

reblogged from Colossal

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What am I baking?

November 6, 2017

Creations are by Ukrainian architect, artist and pastry chef, Dinara Kasko.  See more at her website.