Posts Tagged ‘art’

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Whose birthday am I noting today?

November 14, 2018

Claude Monet 1840 – 1926

A few years ago, I had the pleasure of viewing Monet’s Waterlilies triptych at the Cleveland Museum of Art when it was on tour.  These three enormous panels were brought together for the first time since their creation (I believe)for this tour.  The individual panels are owned by The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Claude Monet, one of the founders of the impressionist movement, was born on November 14, 1840 on the fifth floor of 45 rue Laffitte,in the ninth arrondissement of Paris. He was the second son Claude Adolphe Monet and Louise-Justine Aubree. On the first of April 1851, Monet entered the Le Havre secondary school of the arts. He became known locally for this charcoal caricatures, which he would sell for ten to twenty francs. Monet also undertook his first drawing lessons from Jacques-Francois Ochard, a former student of Jacques-Louis David. On the beaches of Normandy in about 1856/1857 he meet fellow artist Eugéne Boudin who became his mentor and taught him to use oil paints. Boudin taught Monet “en plein air” (outdoor) techniques for painting.

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Have I lost my marbles?

November 12, 2018

 

from My Modern Met

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Why am I saying, “Life imitates art?”

November 8, 2018

 

Actors from the Italian theater company Ludovica Rambelli Teatro recreate paintings by Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, or, more accurately, they’re recreating how Caravaggio created scenes to paint with live models. The performance is called La conversione di un cavallo, 23 Tableaux Vivants dalle opere di Caravaggio, or Tableaux Vivants. It’s set to Lux aeterna, the final section of Wolfgang Amedeus Mozart’s Requiem.

 

More here.

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Why am I saying, “Here there be monsters?”

October 15, 2018

Huge sea monster tentacles protrude from the roof and windows of a warehouse at the former Philadelphia Navy Yard.  The installation was perpetrated by UK artists Filthy Luker and Pedro Estrellas.   They call it, Sea Monsters HERE.  I think it is in a rather fitting location.

 

 

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What am I knitting?

October 8, 2018

“Chain mail, needles, and dishwashing gloves: though not the materials you’d expect a dress to be made from, British artist Susie MacMurray uses them in her garment-inspired sculptures. MacMurray’s first piece in this body of work was Gladrags, made in 2002 from 10,000 pink balloons. Since then, the artist has produced several other seemingly wearable sculptures including Medusa (copper chain mail), Widow (leather and 100,000 dressmaker needles), and A Mixture of Frailties (1,400 household gloves).

“They have all been more concerned with the perception of women, their power and their vulnerabilities,” she explains to Colossal. “I am interested in how human strengths and frailties can often be one and the same thing. I suppose you could almost call them portraits… Much of my sculpture and drawing practice is concerned in one way or another with the perception and negotiation of female identity, both internal and external.”

MacMurray was formerly a classical musician, and she retrained as an artist, graduating in 2001 with an MA in Fine Art. In addition to her garment sculptures, MacMurray also creates drawings and architectural installations. You can see more of her work on her website and Twitter.”

reprinted from Colossal

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With what am I drawing?

October 2, 2018

Originally inspired by the form and function of a sea urchin, artist Jennifer Maestre constructs unwieldy organic forms using pencils and pencil shavings that bloom like unworldly flowers. Some of her latest pieces appear to have grown tentacles and rest atop pedestals like scaley octopi. The artworks are designed to simultaneously attract the viewer but also offer a certain aesthetic defense. She shares in her artist statement:

The spines of the urchin, so dangerous yet beautiful, serve as an explicit warning against contact. The alluring texture of the spines draws the touch in spite of the possible consequences. The tension unveiled, we feel push and pull, desire and repulsion. The sections of pencils present aspects of sharp and smooth for two very different textural and aesthetic experiences. Paradox and surprise are integral in my choice of materials.

I love my colored pencils too much to use them this way – but these are fun to look at.

From Colossal

And it is Tuesday . . .

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What is tattoo Tuesday about?

August 21, 2018

“Some people are lucky enough to have found that special person they’ll spend the rest of their life with. And who wouldn’t want to celebrate that? There are many unconventional ways to tell the world “I’m in love!” Clothing is one form of expression, like couples who wear adorable matching sports jerseys or have spent the last 30 years coordinating outfits. Others take a more permanent approach to displaying their affection through creative couple tattoos.

Having matching or complementary tattoos with a romantic partner is far less temporary than wearing a ring. After all, it can’t (easily) be removed. So, there’s a lot of commitment involved with the decision to get inked in this way. But, it has a big upside—the tattooed beloveds will always carry a symbol of that relationship with them.

Many of those that take the leap sport clever designs. Designers Jessica Hische and Russ Maschmeyer have ink that corresponds to the other—and their professions. Before that, Hische was thinking about her tattoo and got Maschmeyer to go along with it with sound logic. “I convinced him it would be ‘conceptually stronger’ if I got the CMYK version of the same tattoo,” Hische told CreativeBloq. “He was a little freaked out about having a couple’s tattoo, but the more we talked about it the more it made sense. Russ got additive color (RGB) since his career passions were primarily screen-based; I got subtractive color (CMY) because I started my career in print design.” The result is a special tattoo that signifies their deep bond.”

from mymodernmet