Posts Tagged ‘food’

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What am I watching?

January 9, 2019

I admit to being a fan of the Great British Baking Show.  While I enjoy the illustrations describing what the bakers are going to make, I did not give them much thought until I read this article about the show’s illustrator:

In the midst of The Great British Baking Show’s controversial migration between British networks two years ago — a creative decision that lost 75 percent of the show’s personalities — tabloid speculation ran wild at the time about what this new Baking Show iteration would entail, given that the only person following the dough was Paul Hollywood and his piercing blue eyes. The only person on camera, that is. Because also choosing to stay in the show’s family was Tom Hovey, arguably the fifth puzzle piece in its sugary, buttery DNA. You don’t know his face, but you definitely know his work — and that’s because he’s responsible for creating every illustration in Baking Show history, from day one and beyond.

“It’s a real case of being at the right place at the time right time,” Hovey told Vulture about landing the gig. “My best mate worked in television and suggested that I apply for a job in ‘the edit’ at this new cookery show. With no TV experience or idea about how edits worked, I blagged my way in and started two days later.” Soon after beginning this editing job, though, Hovey admitted to the directors and editors that his passion was actually illustration, which spurred the higher-ups to spontaneously incorporate something artistic into the show. “It led to the director coming to me in the second week saying that he felt there was a visual element missing and maybe I could come up with some ideas,” Hovey recalled. “I sketched a few examples, we decided on a style that fit the bill and I got the gig.”

 

more at The Vulture

See also his website

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What am I knitting?

December 26, 2018

from Wirecutter

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Where am I dining today?

December 10, 2018

Each year on December 10, Nobel laureates gather at Stockholm’s City Hall to feast. Receiving a Nobel prize, whether for literature, science, or advances toward world peace, comes with a significant monetary prize, as well as a gold medal bearing the face of Albert Nobel, the explosives tycoon whose will established the awards. But the Nobel banquet, which has been described as “the greatest dinner party on earth,” is its own reward. You might assume that the highlight is the laureates receiving their prizes. But the dessert course is equally climactic: It’s presented with grand sparklers and a parade. For decades, it featured official Nobel ice cream, too.

The very first Nobel banquet in 1901.
The very first Nobel banquet in 1901. Image provided by the Nobel Foundation

Nobel banquets have been held since 1901, and each year, the menu is exquisite. That’s to be expected: Some of the world’s most lauded people, not to mention Swedish royalty and dignitaries, are in attendance. In the first few years, the food was mostly French-style, the cuisine of the elite. Only later in the century did Swedish dishes and ingredients take center stage, with filet of sole being replaced by filet of reindeer. But until recently, there was one constant: For dessert, dozens of waiters descended the grand staircase with trays of Nobel ice cream and sparklers, a fitting accompaniment to the Nobel Prize’s explosive origins.

The Nobel banquet is always a sparkling affair.
The Nobel banquet is always a sparkling affair. Dan Lepp, © Nobel Media AB

The ice cream did vary from parade to parade. But starting in the 1970s, an ice cream bombe became standard (another strangely appropriate choice considering Albert Nobel’s career). This Nobel ice cream typically entailed layers of ice cream and fruit sorbet, decorated with spun sugar and an edible “N” for Nobel, and it was served every year at banquets until the early 2000s. Though the flavors could vary, from raspberry and vanilla to kiwi and passionfruit, Nobel ice cream became a tradition. One documenter of the Nobel banquets called changing the dessert “unthinkable.” But change it did.

At Bistro Nobel, you too can have dessert like a prizewinner.
At Bistro Nobel, you too can have dessert like a prizewinner.

After 1998, chefs tapped to make the Nobel meals were allowed to eschew tradition. According to Nobel Foundation representative Jonna Petterson, this “let a pastry chef create a new dessert for each year with a modern touch.” Since then, Nobel diners have enjoyed their coffee and special Nobel tea blend with ice cream-less desserts such as “Chocolate silhouette with nougat and sea buckthorn explosion.” Thankfully, the pyrotechnic parade continues to this day.

Though hundreds of guests enjoy the banquet each year, the rest of us can only hungrily watch. Even the menu is kept secret until December 10, supposedly to stop restaurants from throwing their own Nobel banquets on the same day. But below Stockholm’s City Hall, the restaurant Stadshuskällaren will sell customers Nobel banquet meals from any year, on any day other than December 10. Or, if you don’t have Nobel Prize money to drop on a lavish dinner, stop by the Nobel Museum. There, the Bistro Nobel serves Nobel ice cream: a berry and vanilla bombe, with spun sugar and a cloudberry, accompanied by one tiny, foil-wrapped Nobel medal, made of dark chocolate.

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Why am I saying, “crank up the jam!”

August 14, 2018

I really don’t think anyone says that anymore.

But . . . I was recently the recipient of some marvelous, creatively-named jams.

Traffic Jam has all the red fruits in it; Bear Jam is based on blackberries; and who knew frogs could taste so good?

Many thanks to Robb.

It’s Tuesday . . .

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What do I find a-peeling?

May 17, 2018

We are getting toward the end of the clementine season – those sweet, easy to peel, lovely to eat little bundles of juice.  Here are some of my lunch time efforts.

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What is tattoo Tuesday about?

May 15, 2018

Spaghetti O’s

Spaghetti o’s, the original, was first offered for sale on this date in 1965.  This product now comes in many varieties such as . . . with meatballs, with sliced franks, with calcium, organic, shaped like Star Wars characters the Mario Brothers, Spiderman, and Princesses.  Something for everyone.

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What am I baking?

March 14, 2018

It’s Pi Day!

“Lauren Ko brings mathematical precision to her baking, using elaborate intertwined patterns to form transfixing patterns to the top of her homemade pies and tarts. The Seattle-based amateur baker has been piecrafting for just a couple of years, she tells Mic, and if you’re wondering, this is her favorite pie crust recipe. Ko combines classic crusts with colorful fillings like blueberries, kumquats, purple sweet potatoes, and pluots to create her visually striking sweets. You can follow her on Instagram.”

 

reblogged from Colossal