Posts Tagged ‘science’

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What am I watching?

January 10, 2019

by Kaplanimo at WordlessTech

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What am I knitting?

February 21, 2018

Nora Fok combines jewelry design with textile art in her science- and math-inspired wearable artworks. Fok, who is based in southeast England, works in her home studio creating all of her pieces manually, using hand tools, fine nylon microfilament and basic processes like weaving, knitting, braiding, and knotting. The work below is comprised of 3,500 knit spheres, and finished pieces can take weeks to produce. The artist describes her inspiration on her website:

She is intrigued by the world around her; she also asks questions and tries to find answers to them. She is fascinated by different aspects of nature, structure, systems and order, and the mysteries and magic which she sets out to capture in her work.

Fok has artwork that is currently being shown in the Jewelry of Ideas exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City, which is up through May 2018, and she shares exhibition dates and a small archive of jewelry on her website. If you like Nora’s work, also check out Mariko Kusumoto.

 

from Colossal

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Why am I glowing?

January 26, 2017

burrows3“Photographer Craig Burrows photographs plants and flowers using a type a photography called UVIVF or “ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence.” If you haven’t heard of it, that’s not a surprise, as it is a relatively unknown process which brings out the glowing fluoresce in plant matter through the use of high-intensity UV lights.

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Typically UV is removed through a camera’s lens, however Burrows photographs with a 365nm LED light which is passed through a filter to transmit only UV and infrared light. The dazzling plant life Burrows’ photographs absorbs this UV light and releases visible light at different wavelengths, which allows him to capture colors far more vivid than those seen in a typical viewing condition.

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Although Burrows has limited his photography to singular flowers and small arrangements, his next step is aimed at illuminating entire scenes, like gardens, glades, and greenhouses, with 100-watt floodlights. You can see more of the Southern California-based photographer’s glowing plant portraits on his Flickr and portfolio site. ”

Credit: Colossal

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Who did we say goodbye to today?

September 30, 2016

 

This morning, Sept. 30, 2016, just after 10:39 UTC (6:39 a.m. EDT) ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft ended its mission with an impact onto the surface of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The descent, begun with a final burn of its thrusters about 14 hours earlier, was slow, stately, and deliberate, but even at a relative walking pace Rosetta was not designed to be a lander like its parter Philae and thus ceased operation upon contact with the comet.

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Rosetta will now remain on the surface of 67P not far from the location of Philae, which landed in November 2014 and was just recently identified in an OSIRIS image after nearly two years of speculation about its final landing place.

All in all, an amazing job by Rosetta, Philae, ESA, and all of  the flight, instrument, and science teams that made the mission an incredible success.  Thanks to their hard work and dedication over the years we now know more about our Solar System and comets especially than we ever did before, and the data Rosetta and Philae have provided us will be used for decades to come.

Rest well, little travelers.

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What am I celebrating?

March 14, 2016

 

PIDAY

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pi day

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What am I painting?

January 21, 2016

starry night

This homage to Vincent’s Starry Night is created by colorful colonies of bacteria grown in petri dishes.

Reblogged from Creative Dreamers with thanks.

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What am I singing?

December 14, 2015

 

Here’s a little ditty to get you in the mood for the holiday season.

More at Scientific Songs of Praise