Posts Tagged ‘astronomy’

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What moon is it?

March 9, 2020

Tonight the moon will be full.  Make sure you get yours.

What do you call the full moon in March?

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What am I Lego loving?

January 22, 2020

The International Space Station set is designed to inspire space enthusiasts young and old

“Lego is adding to its catalog of space-themed kits, today announcing a replica of the International Space Station. Available from next month, the latest product to emerge via Lego’s Ideas program is built to challenge space enthusiasts with a 864-piece set that features moving parts to mimic some of the orbiting laboratory’s realistic functions.

Just like the Saturn V Apollo rocket set, the Women of NASA set and the Apollo 11 Lunar Lander set, the International Space Station set is designed to inspire space enthusiasts young and old by bringing some of humankind’s grandest engineering achievements to the living room floor.”

The Lego Ideas International Space Station kit will be available from February 1 for a price of US$70

As you can see from the image above – this product is not necessarily for children.  The space station will launch on February 1.

from: New Atlas

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Happy Solstice

December 23, 2019

Yesterday was the shortest day of the year here at

41.486338″ N, 81.498847″ W

This is a photo of the shadow of the flagpole outside the local post office at “high” noon yesterday.  The sun never got any higher than this.

I hope you cast your cakes and ale under the trees to help bring back the sun.

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Where is Mercury?

November 11, 2019

Grab your solar eclipse glasses or protected astronomical equipment, because Mercury is marching across the sun as we speak.

The closest planet to the sun began its transit — an apparent passage across the sun from the perspective of Earth — at 7:35 a.m. EST (1235 GMT) and will continue its journey for 5.5 hours. It will be visible in the U.S.and many other parts of the world. Be sure to check this event out, as it will be the last time until 2032 that Mercury transits the sun. And that occurrence  won’t be visible in the U.S.; Americans will have to wait until 2049 for the next visible event.

You can watch the Mercury transit of 2019 live here, courtesy of Slooh.com. You can also watch the Slooh webcast directly here on YouTube.

Quote from Space.com

Of course, the weather here is . . .

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What am I watching?

October 10, 2019

 

I may have posted this earlier, but I like it.

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Where am I traveling?

October 3, 2019
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Where have we traveled?

July 20, 2019

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