Posts Tagged ‘art’

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Why am I saying, “wow?”

December 27, 2018

As someone who has trouble getting her eye makeup on straight, I am in awe of the level of detail in these miniature sculptures by Matthew Simmonds.

His sculptures take a minimum of three weeks to complete, however they can span several months depending on the complexity and size. “The longest I’ve ever worked on a single piece of stone was when I made Windows in 2017,” explains Simmonds. “There was around 180 days, or nine months, of carving time with more time spent on research and design.”  from Colossal

 

 

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What do I want?

December 26, 2018

I want these

A Ukrainian blind company called HoleRoll shared this fun set of concept blinds that feature iconic cityscapes cut into blackout curtains. The silhouettes of famous skyscrapers become apparent as light streams in through the window. The images were posted back in 2014 and it looks like their website is currently down, so not sure if they’re available anywhere. Could make a fun DIY project? (via Laughing Squid, Reddit)

Update 1: Aalto+Aalto has a similar concept from 2006 called Better View.

Update 2: It looks like their website is back up.

from Colosssal

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What am I growing?

December 20, 2018

from Colossal

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Whose music am I P – P – P – Playing?

December 19, 2018

Thanks HMS Defiant for the reference

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What am I knitting?

December 13, 2018

Or, more correctly, crocheting . . .

“For this year’s i Light Marina Bay Festival, a sustainability-focused, Singapore-based spectacle, Choi+Shine Architects created The Urchins, a series of 3 interactive installations. The crochet sea urchin sculptures have been meticulously crafted by hand, offering attendees a one-of-a-kind immersive experience.

Speaking to the event’s theme of sustainability. each 56-foot-tall work of interactive art symbolizes the beauty and diversity of nature. Though, at night, the works are spotlit by artificial luminescence, during the day, The Urchins rely on natural light to cast ephemeral, ever-changing shadows. Similarly, each suspended sculpture organically moves when touched by the wind or even visitors, who are invited to handle the polyester cords and panels that compose it.

Given their large scale, creating each sea urchin was no small feat. Hand-crafting the delicate shells required a team of 50 and took nearly 3 months to complete. While they were only on display for the 3-week duration of the festival, it’s clear that each lacy installation made a lasting impression.”

reblogged from mymodernmet

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What am I gloving?

November 27, 2018

I enjoy painting on leather and have used pieces of old kid gloves in my crazy quilts and wall hangings.  That is why I particularly appreciate the whimsy of Bunnie Reiss’s creations.

“Artist Bunnie Reiss enjoys transforming the old into new, and has spent her life as a collector of weathered objects with rich stories. Reiss’s ongoing project turns her collection of old leather gloves into bright works of art, utilizing symmetry and cosmic imagery to connect both the past and present. The gloves are not obvious references to animal faces, but subtle gestures that reference eyes, ears, and noses within their design.”

“In addition to painting smaller works, Reiss also creates large installations and mural walls. Her most recent work is a 3,500 square foot mural painted on the east side of Milwaukee for the Black Cat Mural Alley. You can see more of her large and small-scale works on her website and Instagram.”

 

From Colossal

 

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Whose birthday am I noting today?

November 14, 2018

Claude Monet 1840 – 1926

A few years ago, I had the pleasure of viewing Monet’s Waterlilies triptych at the Cleveland Museum of Art when it was on tour.  These three enormous panels were brought together for the first time since their creation (I believe)for this tour.  The individual panels are owned by The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Claude Monet, one of the founders of the impressionist movement, was born on November 14, 1840 on the fifth floor of 45 rue Laffitte,in the ninth arrondissement of Paris. He was the second son Claude Adolphe Monet and Louise-Justine Aubree. On the first of April 1851, Monet entered the Le Havre secondary school of the arts. He became known locally for this charcoal caricatures, which he would sell for ten to twenty francs. Monet also undertook his first drawing lessons from Jacques-Francois Ochard, a former student of Jacques-Louis David. On the beaches of Normandy in about 1856/1857 he meet fellow artist Eugéne Boudin who became his mentor and taught him to use oil paints. Boudin taught Monet “en plein air” (outdoor) techniques for painting.