Posts Tagged ‘geeky science blogging’

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Why am I looking up?

January 16, 2020

“When the Sun is in the right position and, typically, hidden from direct view, these thin clouds can be seen significantly diffracting sunlight in a nearly coherent manner, with different colors being deflected by different amounts. Therefore, different colors will come to the observer from slightly different directions. Many clouds start with uniform regions that could show iridescence but quickly become too thick, too mixed, or too angularly far from the Sun to exhibit striking colors.

The featured image and an the video were taken late last year over Ostersund, Sweden.”

Video credit: Göran Strand

reblog from WirelessTech

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Happy Solstice

December 23, 2019

Yesterday was the shortest day of the year here at

41.486338″ N, 81.498847″ W

This is a photo of the shadow of the flagpole outside the local post office at “high” noon yesterday.  The sun never got any higher than this.

I hope you cast your cakes and ale under the trees to help bring back the sun.

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What am I noting today?

October 23, 2019

What Is Mole Day? - Date and How to Celebrate

Today is Mole Day – 10/23

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What am I watching?

October 10, 2019

 

I may have posted this earlier, but I like it.

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Where am I traveling?

October 3, 2019
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What am I writing?

September 4, 2019

 

Like the video “Powers of 10”, but we know more now.

from Colossal

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Where have we traveled?

July 20, 2019

Edit

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What am I sappy T Rex blogging?

May 10, 2019

Baby T-Rex could be the Cutest Floor Monster - Absolute ...

Article from LiveScience – click here to see the animated gif of baby T rex (it is copyrighted, hence the link.)

“It may be hard to imagine towering Tyrannosaurus rex as tiny, but the toothy Cretaceous giant didn’t spring from an egg fully grown. In fact, T. rex hatchlings were about the size of very skinny turkeys, with “arms” that were longer in proportion to their tiny bodies than in adults. And each baby T. rex was covered in a coat of downy feathers.

What’s more, T. rex‘s feathers likely grew along the animal’s head and tail into adulthood, according to new reconstructions that represent the most accurate models of the dinosaur to date. . . . more.”

 

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What am I embroidering?

March 13, 2019

The Embroidered Computer by Irene Posch and Ebru Kurbak doesn’t look like what you might expect when you think of a computer. Instead, the work looks like an elegantly embroidered textile, complete with glass and magnetic beads and a meandering pattern of copper wire. The materials have conductive properties which are arranged in specific patterns to create electronic functions. Gold pieces on top of the magnetic beads flip depending on the program, switching sides as different signals are channeled through the embroidered work.

“Traditionally purely decorative, [the work’s patterns] defines their function,” explained Posch on her website. “They lay bare core digital routines usually hidden in black boxes. Users are invited to interact with the piece in programming the textile to compute for them.”

The piece is a reference to the historic similarity between textile creation and computing, for example the Jacquard loom being an important influence on the evolution of computing hardware. Posch is a researcher and artist with a background in media and computer science who explores the how technological seeps into the fields of art and craft, and Kurbak is an artist and designer who investigates the hidden politics of everyday spaces and routines. You can learn more about their work and partnerships here or here.

from  Colossal

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What am I watching this time?

February 20, 2019