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Where am I living now?

January 7, 2019

denver18

I found this little gem of a photo series on my weekly fish through the LIFE archives, accompanied by just a few clues to the full story behind it. Filed under “Underground House in Denver, photographed in 1964 by Robert W Kelley”, I did a quick Google search of underground homes built or exhibited in 1964. The most relevant result I found was the Wikipedia page of an American businessman and philanthropist called Girard B. Henderson, who pioneered underground living and sponsored the Underground Home exhibit at the New York World’s Fair in 1964. But he also built homes in Colorado and Las Vegas, the latter of which you might remember we visited when it re-surfaced on the real estate market in 2013 for $1.7 million.

checking conditions outside

reblogged from messynessychic

Where am I living archives

 

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What am I sappy cat blogging?

January 4, 2019

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What am I crocheting?

January 3, 2019

Lost & Found is an endearing stop motion film that chronicles a dramatic turning point in the sweet relationship between two crocheted animal toys. A foxy fox and smitten dinosaur have enjoyed many special memories in their adopted home of a Japanese restaurant’s lost and found bin. But when the fox topples into a fountain, the dinosaur must give his all to save her. The short film, directed by Andrew Goldsmith and Bradley Slabe and produced by Lucy J. Hayes, convincingly imagines the inner lives of its stuffed animal protagonists and uses the fragile nature of crochet as the crux of the storyline. Lost & Found has been widely lauded at film festivals since its debut this year. from Colossal

 

Watch the film here

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How am I dancing?

January 2, 2019

Dancers from the Washington Ballet demonstrate their most difficult ballet moves.

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What am I sappy owl blogging?

December 28, 2018

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Why am I saying, “wow?”

December 27, 2018

As someone who has trouble getting her eye makeup on straight, I am in awe of the level of detail in these miniature sculptures by Matthew Simmonds.

His sculptures take a minimum of three weeks to complete, however they can span several months depending on the complexity and size. “The longest I’ve ever worked on a single piece of stone was when I made Windows in 2017,” explains Simmonds. “There was around 180 days, or nine months, of carving time with more time spent on research and design.”  from Colossal

 

 

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What do I want?

December 26, 2018

I want these

A Ukrainian blind company called HoleRoll shared this fun set of concept blinds that feature iconic cityscapes cut into blackout curtains. The silhouettes of famous skyscrapers become apparent as light streams in through the window. The images were posted back in 2014 and it looks like their website is currently down, so not sure if they’re available anywhere. Could make a fun DIY project? (via Laughing Squid, Reddit)

Update 1: Aalto+Aalto has a similar concept from 2006 called Better View.

Update 2: It looks like their website is back up.

from Colosssal