Posts Tagged ‘colored pencils’

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With what am I drawing?

October 2, 2018

Originally inspired by the form and function of a sea urchin, artist Jennifer Maestre constructs unwieldy organic forms using pencils and pencil shavings that bloom like unworldly flowers. Some of her latest pieces appear to have grown tentacles and rest atop pedestals like scaley octopi. The artworks are designed to simultaneously attract the viewer but also offer a certain aesthetic defense. She shares in her artist statement:

The spines of the urchin, so dangerous yet beautiful, serve as an explicit warning against contact. The alluring texture of the spines draws the touch in spite of the possible consequences. The tension unveiled, we feel push and pull, desire and repulsion. The sections of pencils present aspects of sharp and smooth for two very different textural and aesthetic experiences. Paradox and surprise are integral in my choice of materials.

I love my colored pencils too much to use them this way – but these are fun to look at.

From Colossal

And it is Tuesday . . .

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What am I chewing on today?

March 30, 2015

pencil7Today is National Pencil Day.

I love colored pencils.  They are my favorite drawing tool.  Jennifer Maestre takes the medium in an entirely different direction, however,  with her amazing and fanciful sculptures created from colored pencils.

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From nationalcalendarday.com:

Each year, March 30th is National Pencil Day.  Hymen Lipman received the first patent for attaching an eraser to the end of a pencil on this day in 1858.

The majority of pencils made in the United States are painted yellow.  It is believed that this tradition began in 1890 when the L & C Hardtmuth Company of Austria-Hungary introduced their Koh-I-Noor brand, named after the famous diamond.  This pencil was intended to be the world’s best and most expensive pencil.  Other companies then began to copy the yellow color so that their pencils would be associated with the high quality brand.

Notable pencil users (Wikipedia)

  • Thomas Edison had his pencils specially made by Eagle Pencil. Each pencil was three inches long, was thicker than standard pencils and had softer graphite than was normally available.
  • Vladimir Nabokov rewrote everything he had ever published, usually several times, by pencil.
  • John Steinbeck was an obsessive pencil user and is said to have used as many as 60 a day. His novel East of Eden took more than 300 pencils to write.
  • Vincent van Gogh used only Faber pencils as they were “superior to Carpenters pencils, a capital black and most agreeable”.
  • Johnny Carson regularly played with pencils at his Tonight Show desk. These pencils were specially made with erasers at both ends to avoid on-set accidents.
  • Roald Dahl used only pencils with yellow casing to write his books. He had 6 sharpened pencils ready at the beginning of each day and only when all 6 pencils became unusable did he resharpen them.